Tickets

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  • LIMITED TO TEN PARTICIPANTS: How do feelings come up in our classes? A short blurb about the counseling center on our syllabus? A shove of the tissue box during office hours? A 20-minute segment in a 75-minute lesson plan? This class will explore what are our options as educators, and not trained health professionals, to hold space for the feelings of our students. How can we call feelings into the class while attending to all many other course concerns? Through writing exercises, we’ll explore what it means to take a feelings-centered approach in the classroom. We will think about how caring for feelings can in turn impart greater care for the subject at hand. We will spend considerable time thinking about what it means to lead students “in and out of the fire” of opening up, all while attending to our own comfort level with doing such work. While the workshop activities are writing-focused, this class is open to teachers across disciplines, to anyone who hopes to make a classroom, in particular the online space, feel more human.
  • LIMITED TO TEN PARTICIPANTS: This workshop introduces participants to basic improv exercises and how they can be of use to one’s teaching, either by bringing them into the classroom or by applying improv philosophies towards a wide variety of disciplines. The session focuses in particular on how improv can support an online learning space. Doing a series of focus exercises, we’ll reflect on what it means to attune to a new way of focusing in a screen-sized classroom space. Shifting to some low-stakes scene work, we’ll explore how we can build a sense of trust amongst everyone in a virtual classroom, trust in this new shared space, so as to do our best work together. We will specifically think about moments where we feel unsure in online teaching. Through our improv games, we will explore how we can “yes and” a variety of disruptions, so to move through them most efficiently and without getting “stuck.” This workshop is for performers and non-performers alike. We all improvised our way through this new transition. How can we now re-frame our relationship with the online space? How can we use improv to get playful within the Zoom frame, to make it bend and stretch and ultimately fall away?
  • LIMITED TO TEN PARTICIPANTS: How do feelings come up in our classes? A short blurb about the counseling center on our syllabus? A shove of the tissue box during office hours? A 20-minute segment in a 75-minute lesson plan? This class will explore what are our options as educators, and not trained health professionals, to hold space for the feelings of our students. How can we call feelings into the class while attending to all many other course concerns? Through writing exercises, we’ll explore what it means to take a feelings-centered approach in the classroom. We will think about how caring for feelings can in turn impart greater care for the subject at hand. We will spend considerable time thinking about what it means to lead students “in and out of the fire” of opening up, all while attending to our own comfort level with doing such work. While the workshop activities are writing-focused, this class is open to teachers across disciplines, to anyone who hopes to make a classroom, in particular the online space, feel more human.
  • LIMITED TO TEN PARTICIPANTS: This workshop introduces participants to basic improv exercises and how they can be of use to one’s teaching, either by bringing them into the classroom or by applying improv philosophies towards a wide variety of disciplines. The session focuses in particular on how improv can support an online learning space. Doing a series of focus exercises, we’ll reflect on what it means to attune to a new way of focusing in a screen-sized classroom space. Shifting to some low-stakes scene work, we’ll explore how we can build a sense of trust amongst everyone in a virtual classroom, trust in this new shared space, so as to do our best work together. We will specifically think about moments where we feel unsure in online teaching. Through our improv games, we will explore how we can “yes and” a variety of disruptions, so to move through them most efficiently and without getting “stuck.” This workshop is for performers and non-performers alike. We all improvised our way through this new transition. How can we now re-frame our relationship with the online space? How can we use improv to get playful within the Zoom frame, to make it bend and stretch and ultimately fall away?
By the power of Tito

Schedule

Monday, 13 July 2020

11:10am – 12:10pm It's Just a Feeling

How do feelings come up in our classes? A short blurb about the counseling center on our syllabus? A shove of the tissue box during office hours? A 20-minute segment in a 75-minute lesson plan? This class will explore what are our options as educators, and not trained health professionals, to hold space for the feelings of our students. How can we call feelings into the class while attending to all many other course concerns? Through writing exercises, we’ll explore what it means to take a feelings-centered approach in the classroom. We will think about how caring for feelings can in turn impart greater care for the subject at hand. We will spend considerable time thinking about what it means to lead students “in and out of the fire” of opening up, all while attending to our own comfort level with doing such work. While the workshop activities are writing-focused, this class is open to teachers across disciplines, to anyone who hopes to make a classroom, in particular the online space, feel more human.

12:20pm – 1:20pm Getting Playful in the Online Space

This workshop introduces participants to basic improv exercises and how they can be of use to one’s teaching, either by bringing them into the classroom or by applying improv philosophies towards a wide variety of disciplines. The session focuses in particular on how improv can support an online learning space. Doing a series of focus exercises, we’ll reflect on what it means to attune to a new way of focusing in a screen-sized classroom space. Shifting to some low-stakes scene work, we’ll explore how we can build a sense of trust amongst everyone in a virtual classroom, trust in this new shared space, so to do our best work together. We will specifically think about moments where we feel unsure in online teaching. Through our improv games, we will explore how we can “yes and” a variety of disruptions, so to move through them most efficiently and without getting “stuck.” This workshop is for performers and non-performers alike. We all improvised our way through this new transition. How can we now re-frame our relationship with the online space? How can we use improv to get playful within the Zoom frame, to make it bend and stretch and ultimately fall away?

Tuesday, 14 July 2020

2:40pm – 3:40pm It's Just A Feeling

How do feelings come up in our classes? A short blurb about the counseling center on our syllabus? A shove of the tissue box during office hours? A 20-minute segment in a 75-minute lesson plan? This class will explore what are our options as educators, and not trained health professionals, to hold space for the feelings of our students. How can we call feelings into the class while attending to all many other course concerns? Through writing exercises, we’ll explore what it means to take a feelings-centered approach in the classroom. We will think about how caring for feelings can in turn impart greater care for the subject at hand. We will spend considerable time thinking about what it means to lead students “in and out of the fire” of opening up, all while attending to our own comfort level with doing such work. While the workshop activities are writing-focused, this class is open to teachers across disciplines, to anyone who hopes to make a classroom, in particular the online space, feel more human

3:50pm – 4:50pm Getting Playful in The Online Space

This workshop introduces participants to basic improv exercises and how they can be of use to one’s teaching, either by bringing them into the classroom or by applying improv philosophies towards a wide variety of disciplines. The session focuses in particular on how improv can support an online learning space. Doing a series of focus exercises, we’ll reflect on what it means to attune to a new way of focusing in a screen-sized classroom space. Shifting to some low-stakes scene work, we’ll explore how we can build a sense of trust amongst everyone in a virtual classroom, trust in this new shared space, so to do our best work together. We will specifically think about moments where we feel unsure in online teaching. Through our improv games, we will explore how we can “yes and” a variety of disruptions, so to move through them most efficiently and without getting “stuck.” This workshop is for performers and non-performers alike. We all improvised our way through this new transition. How can we now re-frame our relationship with the online space? How can we use improv to get playful within the Zoom frame, to make it bend and stretch and ultimately fall away?